YIPL / TAP Magazine Back Issues
    Steal These Files    

Overview

On May Day 1971, in Washington D.C. (or thereabouts - it makes a good legend), a flyer was distributed advertising a revolutionary newsletter named Youth International Party Line or "YIPL" for short.  This flyer was headed with a caption of "F*CK THE BELL SYSTEM."  The flyer told of a new "underground" newsletter that was anti-establishment and was to be published on a regular basis.

This was the beginning of the YIPL Newsletter, which later became known as TAP, the hobbyist's newsletter for the communications revolution.  YIPL was founded by the late (((Abbie Hoffman))) and "Al Bell," a phone phreak from Long Island, New York.  Abbie Hoffman is also most famous for being the founder of the "Yippie" movement.

YIPL was aimed more towards ripping off the largest corporate giant at the time, none other than Ma Bell.  Of course, today we now know that the Bell System was probably one of the greatest technical (and honest) entities to ever have existed.  Believe it or not, there was time when your telephone calls "just worked" and the audio quality was even pretty good!

"My name is Al Bell, and a few of us started this on Mayday, in 1971.  YIPL is the result of one phone phreak's realization that the Military-Industrial Komplex is not just a term you learn in school, but a force that controls the planet Earth from the country America.  It became apparent to me that the vast majority of people are being used as pawns, as slaves to make a few multi-millionaires even richer.  It's all done through MIC, whose main tactic is Divide and Conquer.  Most people don't agree with me, thus proving how effective that tactic is.  So people war with each other, and the pigs get richer."

    --- Excerpt from an editorial by "Al Bell" in YIPL, Issue #15.

Abbie Hoffman was your typical 1960s leftist and pampered student "revolutionist."  Hoffman called for communal living, supported the drug culture, homosexuality & pedophilia, supported "divide-and-conquer" tactics against Whites, supported various Marxist ("progressive") causes over American causes, and openly attacked traditional/conservative/White ethics and morals, pushed anti-female sentiment masked as "feminism," and even supported domestic terrorist attacks against military and CIA recruiters on college campuses.  Begging one to ask, "Where were these anti-war, anti-draft protesters during World War 2?"  Hmmm...

He often called for the destruction of all Western governments, particularly the American nation itself:

"We shall not defeat Amerika by organizing a political party.  We shall do it by building a new nation - a nation as rugged as the marijuana leaf."

    --- 1969 quote (Mirror) from Abbie Hoffman in the book Woodstock Nation: A Talk-Rock Album.

Abbie Hoffman idolized Karl Marx, Saul Alinsky, Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, Mao Tse-Tung, etc.  He openly supported rioters, murderers, culture subversion, and your assorted "anti-American" types - all while living in the U.S. on our tax dollars and under our Constitution - of course.  Hoffman was basically a direct ideological descendant of the Bolshevik, and all-around tyrant, ((("Red" Emma Goldman))).

Abbie Hoffman and his criminal cohorts received massive financial support from Sol Yassenoff-types who amassed vast fortunes from shady real-estate dealings, stock market manipulation and speculation, currency manipulation, shady hedge funds, private central banking, or just general profiteering.


Abbie Hoffman in a Nutshell

They also claimed to be "for the people and working class," but in reality, they hobnobbed with some of the richest One Percent and influential people in the United States, including the editor of TIME Magazine (who helped Hoffman beat a drug charge) and an Executive Vice President of AT&T.  You know, the same company they claimed to "hate" so much...

Hoffman went on to write the infamous book entitled Steal This Book and was one of the original "Chicago Seven" during the National Democratic Convention arrests in 1968.  They became famous for protesting against the war in Vietnam, but suspiciously not those wars against the Palestinians, Israel's "enemies," or World War 1, World War 2, Communist take-overs in Eastern Europe or South America, etc.  Hmmm...

Abbie Hoffman was also friends with a fellow professional grifter, (((Ira Einhorn))).

Besides claiming to start Earth Day (Mirror), Ira Einhorn is probably most famous for murdering his then girlfriend - the beautiful Helen "Holly" Maddux.

Holly Maddux        Holly Maddux        Holly Maddux
Helen "Holly" Maddux

In September of 1977, Holly Maddux had her head bashed in and was left to die (and decompose) in a trunk in Ira Einhorn's Philadelphia apartment for 18 months - all while Ira still lived there!

With the help of now-Senator (((Arlen Specter))), Einhorn was able to reduce his bail to only $40,000, of which he only had to put up $4,000.  Normally, alleged murderers don't get bail...

Holly Maddux's Remains
Holly Maddux's Remains

Our modern-day Leo Frank was aided by the vast fortune and political power of (((Barbara Bronfman))), the wife of Seagram Liquor heir (((Charles Bronfman))), Einhorn was able to flee to Europe where he lived freely under the assumed name "Eugene Mallon."

Because nothing says "helping the working class" like having a billionaire help you hide after one of your Satanic ritual murders...


Ira Einhorn's Mugshot

After 22 years of living in Europe, Ira Einhorn was finally caught by the French police and extradited to the United States in July of 2001.

In December of 2002, Ira Einhorn was found guilty (he blamed the CIA in his defense!) and sentenced to life in prison for the first-degree murder of Holly Maddux.  He died in prison in April of 2020


"Counter-Culture" Con Men:  Ira Einhorn and Abbie Hoffman in 1969

Abbie Hoffman later gave up publishing YIPL and passed the torch onto others.  He became a fairly successful attorney and authored several other books, including Steal This Urine Test and Revolution for the Hell of It.

Abbie Hoffman (accidentally?) committed suicide on April 12, 1989 by overdosing on phenobarbital.  Hoffman was rich when he died.

The first 20 issues of the newsletter were simply called Youth International Party Line or "YIPL"  However, beginning with issue number 21, the name was changed to TAP, which stood for "Technological American Party."  This eventually led to them having trouble getting a bank account with the word "Party" in their title without being an actual bona fide political party.

Later, starting with issue number 59, TAP then stood for "Technological Assistance Program" with "Tom Edison" from New Jersey the new Editor-in-Chief.  Still later, TAP no longer stood for anything.  TAP - was simply "TAP."

The original TAP ceased publication with issue number 91 in 1984 with "Cheshire Catalyst" (Robert Osband) the last editor (1983 to 1984) after Tom Edison's apartment was firebombed (the cops said it was a very professional break-in, but the fire marshal said it was a very amateur arson) and his computer equipment stolen in August of 1983.  TAP's subscriber base was said to have been around 4,000.

During its 13 year reign, TAP was often published sporadically.  Subscribers never really knew when they would get an issue.  Many subscribers complained about paying and then not receiving any issues.  Over the years, TAP published on many mediums.  TAP published articles on all kinds of unusual things, ideas, and tactics.  Most of them would be illegal if actually employed.  Phone phreaking was a major issue, plus there were articles on lockpicking, homemade highs and drugs, hacking, rip-offs, cons, scams, vending machine ripoffs, etc.  Most all of the subject matter was controversial and always "anti-establishment," and sometimes border-line anarchistic.  TAP was truly a legend as it united phone phreaks and other "techno-phreaks."

Actually, TAP was truly the first hacker newsletter, although the word "hacker" was virtually unknown at the time TAP began publishing.  It is amazing that TAP survived printing almost a hundred original issues.  Many E-zines and newsletters today never get past a few issues.


The "New" TAP

"Well TAP isn't that easy to kill!  I'm sure it will re-surface in one form or another sometime in the next decade."

    --- Quote from Cheshire Catalyst in a 1985 interview with "The Infiltrator" while at a TAP meeting in New York City.

In March of 1989, the "new" TAP was born in Louisville, Kentucky.  A couple of hackers named Aristotle (Kevin P. Jones, Editor #92-#100), Predat0r (John Parrish, Editor #101-#107), and Olorin The White (Society for the Freedom of Information) began publishing their own version of TAP.  Their first issue was #92 - taking up the reins right where the original TAP left off.

The "new" TAP just never was the same as the "old" TAP.  The new TAP started off being "free" for a stamp.  Later, with around issue #101, a $10.00 subscription fee was incurred.  Many people had lost money on the "old" TAP, thus most subscribers were leery of sending in $10 to the "new" TAP.

Not surprisingly, the same problems existed with the new TAP as the old one - subscription problems and publishing deadlines.  Subscribers once again never knew when an issue would arrive.  Keep in mind that TAP was not a high class operation - it was usually printed on borrowed copy machines, donated paper, etc.  TAP was not a "Madison Ave" publication nor was it meant to be.

After publishing issue #107, TAP never printed another issue.  TAP is dead, and should remain dead.

I was able to acquire original "new" TAP issues #97, #98, #99, #100, #101, #103, #104, and #105.  They have been re-scanned at a higher resolution for easier reading.


The "Newest" TAP

Put out by TA Publications and NESOG, and edited by John Galt, the newest incarnation of TAP will have a more small-government, survivalist feel.

The newest issue started with #108 and was released in January 2009.





Miscellaneous Notes, Links, and Flier Information

Missing from this archive are TAP Issues #106, #107, and there are also rumors of an unfinished, "original" issues #92 and #108.  Also missing:

Letter-to-Editor: TAP, Issue #48

One of the major reasons I am displeased with what TAP
has become is that you have spent nearly 50% of the damn
space bitching and venting your spleen and other organs
about what you don't like about us, the readers.  We
subscribed because the original version contained inter-
esting and useful information, not the ravings of an
ego-maniac who is pissed at himself because he can't
handle the job, and wants somebody else to do it for him.
Knock off the crap, and get back to business, or I shall
cancel also.

   Wash., D.C.

Heh...  They had the same problems as $2600 Magazine!



YIPL Newsletter

Download Issues

Note: Most issues are now in a single PDF file.

YIPL Magazine - Issue #1  June 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #2  July 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #3  August 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #4  September 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #5  October 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #6  November 1971


YIPL Magazine - Issue #7  December 1971 - January 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #8  February 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #9  March - April 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #10  May 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #11  June - July 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #12  August 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #13  September - October 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #14  November 1972


YIPL Magazine - Issue #15  December 1972 - January 1973


YIPL Magazine - Issue #16  February 1973


YIPL Magazine - Issue #17  March - April 1973


YIPL Magazine - Issue #18  May 1973


YIPL Magazine - Issue #19  June 1973


YIPL Magazine - Issue #20  July 1973



Name Changed to "TAP"

TAP Magazine - Issue #21  August - September 1973


TAP Magazine - Issue #22  October 1973


TAP Magazine - Issue #23  November 1973


TAP Magazine - Issue #24  December 1973


TAP Magazine - Issue #25  January - February 1974


TAP Magazine - Issue #26  March 1974


TAP Magazine - Issue #27  November 1974


TAP Magazine - Issue #28  March 1975


TAP Magazine - Issue #29  October 1975


TAP Magazine - Issue #30  November 1975


TAP Magazine - Issue #31  December 1975


TAP Magazine - Issue #32  January 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #33  February - March 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #34  April 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #35  May 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #36  June 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #37  July - August 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #38  September 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #39  September - October 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #40  November 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #41  December 1976


TAP Magazine - Issue #42  January - February 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #43  March - April 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #44  May - June 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #45  July - August 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #46  September - October 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #47  November - December 1977


TAP Magazine - Issue #48  January - February 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #49  March - April 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #50  May - June 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #51  July 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #52  August 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #53  September - October 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #54  November - December 1978


TAP Magazine - Issue #55  January - February 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #56  March - April 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #57  May - June 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #58  July - August 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #59  September - October 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #60  November - December 1979


TAP Magazine - Issue #61  January - February 1980


TAP Magazine - Issue #62  March - April 1980


TAP Magazine - Issue #63  Summer 1980


TAP Magazine - Issue #64  Fall 1980


TAP Magazine - Issue #65  January - February 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #66  March - April 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #67  May - June 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #68  July - August 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #69  September - October 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #70  November - December 1981


TAP Magazine - Issue #71  January 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #72  February 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #73  March 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #74  April 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #75  May - June 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #76  July - August 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #77  September 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #78  October 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #79  November 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #80  December 1982


TAP Magazine - Issue #81  January 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #82  February 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #83  March 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #84  April 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #85  May - June 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #86  July - August 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #87  September - October 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #88  November 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #89  December 1983


TAP Magazine - Issue #90  January - February 1984


TAP Magazine - Issue #91  Spring 1984



The "New" TAP

TAP Magazine - Issue #92  Spring 1989


TAP Magazine - Issue #93  June 1989


TAP Magazine - Issue #94  Fall 1989


TAP Magazine - Issue #95  November 1989


TAP Magazine - Issue #96  December 1989


TAP Magazine - Issue #97  January 1990


TAP Magazine - Issue #98  Spring 1990


TAP Magazine - Issue #99  June 1990


TAP Magazine - Issue #100  September 1990


TAP Magazine - Issue #101  December 1990


TAP Magazine - Issue #102  January 1991


TAP Magazine - Issue #103  February 1991


TAP Magazine - Issue #104  March 1991


TAP Magazine - Issue #105  June 1991


TAP Magazine - Issue #106  


TAP Magazine - Issue #107  



The "Newest" TAP

TAP Magazine - Issue #108  January 2009


TAP Magazine - Issue #109  February 2009


TAP Magazine - Issue #110  March 2009


TAP Magazine - Issue #111  April 2009




Knowledge is Power

GBPPR Projects